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Evaluation of Habitat for Humanity Tanzania on the welfare of marginalized groups in Dodoma District : the case of Chidachi and Chisasa Housing Programme

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dc.contributor.advisor Ndaro, Japhet M.M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Mwakalalila, Mwenda Innocent Raphael en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-13T15:18:56Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-13T15:18:56Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10474/61
dc.description.abstract This study was conducted in Chisasa and Chidachi, Dodoma Urban District, Tanzania. The general objective of the study was to assess the impact of Habitat for Humanity in housing provision to the marginalized groups of Dodoma on poverty housing alleviation. The specific objectives were to assess the impact of Habitat for Humanity and determine factors that influenced the completion of house construction, but also find out the problems that hindered the development of housing construction. The study used a random sample of 58 stakeholders. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression.. Factors that significantly influenced the completion of housing construction were: - Educational level, Age group, Household Size, Marriage Type, Estimated Value of the house, Habitat Assistance, Source of Income and Housing Gains. The results of impact assessment indicated that 60 % of the respondents benefited from the activities of Habitat Tanzania. This is a reasonable success in promoting low-cost housing. A total of 40 houses have been completed between 2000 and 2003. However, 50% of the respondents constructed and completed their houses in 2000 while 30% did so in 2001. In 2002, 15% constructed and completed their houses and 5% did so in 2003.With regard to Habitats initiatives in Dodoma, out of 40 respondents, 21 (Or 52.5%) indicated that it was very good. As an equal opportunity institution Habitat Tanzania adheres very much to its vision and mission. It has been clearly evidenced that Habitat Tanzania deploys two mobilization methods to publicize itself. 82.5% of the respondents learned through Habitat low cost housing sensitization meetings while 12.5% of the respondents learned through media communication. In most consumption situations, the pattern has changed positively. This implies that the impact of the programmed on food consumption in the study area has been positive as a result of savings obtained from not paying house-rent. The other implications, which emerge from the study, are that access to loans given by Habitat did not favor high-income earners because their capacity to repay was likely to be greater than low-income earners. Secondly, the low-income earners benefited more from Habitat loans than high-income earners and were given greater opportunities to access relatively bigger loans than high-income earners. Other related issues investigated in the study were whether beneficiaries faced problems in repayment of the loans acquired. According to the interviews made, 90% said that own monthly contributions in the form of local materials collected and payments made for brick laying was too high and this made low-income earners to suffer. This is a possible explanation for the decline in the number of houses constructed between 2000 and 2003. The loan repayment was in terms of two bags of cement per month. Since the price of cement has been rising due to inflation, one was compelled to pay about Tshs 20,000 every month in addition to expenses on brick laying and roofing. This was considered a burden to the low-income loaners. As a result it was suggested that the programmed should meet bricklaying and roofing costs in order to solve this problem. (Author abstract) en
dc.format.extent 4851163 bytes en_US
dc.format.extent 1933890 bytes en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.language.iso sw en_US
dc.publisher Southern New Hampshire University en_US
dc.relation.requires Adobe Acrobat Reader en_US
dc.rights Author retains all ownership rights. Further reproduction in violation of copyright is prohibited en_US
dc.source Original format: Bound CED Project Report, Shapiro Library, Southern New Hampshire University en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Southern New Hampshire University -- Theses (Community Economic Development) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Open University of Tanzania -- Theses (Community Economic Development) en_US
dc.subject.other micro lending en_US
dc.subject.other home construction en_US
dc.subject.other Habitat for Humanity en_US
dc.subject.other budgeting en_US
dc.subject.other Dodoma Urban District (TZ) en_US
dc.subject.other Dodoma Region (TZ) en_US
dc.subject.other Tanzania en_US
dc.title Evaluation of Habitat for Humanity Tanzania on the welfare of marginalized groups in Dodoma District : the case of Chidachi and Chisasa Housing Programme en_US
dc.title.alternative Evaluation of Habitat for Humanity Tanzania on the welfare of marginalized groups in Dodoma District : the case of Chidachi and Chisasa Housing Program en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.bibliographicCitation Mwakalalila, M. I. R. (2005). Evaluation of Habitat for Humanity Tanzania on the welfare of marginalized groups in Dodoma District: the case of Chidachi and Chisasa Housing Programme. Retrieved from http://academicarchive.snhu.edu en_US
dc.description.degree Master of Science (M.S.) en_US
dc.description.school School of Community Economic Development en_US
dc.digSpecs Creation hardware: Epson Expression 10000XL Color Flatbed Scanner. Creation software: ABBYY FineReader Professional 9.0; Adobe Acrobat Professional 9.0 en_US
dc.format.mediaType PDF en_US
dc.rightsHolder Mwakalalila, Mwenda Innocent Raphael


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